Posts in ‘Growing Tips’

Stress relieving lavender and lemon balm herbal tea

Posted by Carole in Growing Tips

It’s bridal season.  Along with the creation of many many gorgeous bouquets and centerpieces, comes piles of paperwork, meetings, brainstorming and sometimes sleepless nights.  This is usually a great time to turn to my herb garden for all the wonderful healing benefits it can provide.

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Field to Vase in Sudbury

Posted by Carole in Growing Tips

I am sure you’ve heard the term “Farm to Table”. This usually refers to locally sourced fresh produce, which as you know not only tastes better, but also supports the local economy.  Did you know that there is also a “Flower Farm to Table” movement as well?  Also referred to as the “Field to Vase” movement.  It’s a very big deal in other parts of the world, and it’s definitely making its way to Canada.

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Foxglove love

Posted by Carole in Growing Tips

I’ve always been a big fan of Foxglove blossoms. Maybe it’s because they’re the type of flower you’d likely find at a cottage, and for me, my cottage is like my own little piece of paradise. Last year I decided to sow a few Foxglove seeds in my greenhouse. Although they grew nicely, they didn’t produce any blooms. They are a biennial flower, so I figured they would probably bloom this year…and they did.

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What’s new in the garden

Posted by Carole in Growing Tips

What did one raindrop say to another? Two’s company, three’s a cloud!

Today it rained…and rained…and rained. That’s ok though, my garden was thirsty. When it finally stopped raining, I decided to slip into my boots and take a few pics.

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Something ‘eggciting’ is happening at Flower Towne

Posted by Carole in Growing Tips

 

Although it’s finally Spring, the weather certainly isn’t very Spring-like.  This week we’ve decided to focus on forcing bulbs.  We’re sure it will help kick-start this season!

This is a fun little project that you can easily do at home.  It’s a perfect centrepiece for your Easter dinner table.  Start with a six pack of eggs.  I prefer the brown ones, although I’m not sure why.  Perhaps it reminds me of when I used to collect them at my grandmother’s farm (feeling warm and fuzzy).

Carefully make a hole in the top of the egg, and start peeling the shells back until the hole is large enough that you can fit your bulb into your egg.  Pour out your egg and save it for tomorrow’s breakfast. Rinse your empty shell with water.

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